The Double Hour (image 1)

Not so much a genre movie as a movie that switches between genres – and comes out on top.

Boyd Van Hoeij, Variety

Screened as part of NZIFF 2010

The Double Hour 2009

La doppia ora

Directed by Giuseppe Capotondi

A pretty Slovenian chambermaid joins a speed-dating club, meets a handsome security guard – and is mysteriously implicated in a crime she can’t remember in this cunningly plotted Italian psychological thriller.

Italy In Italian with English subtitles
95 minutes CinemaScope

Producers

Nicola Giuliano
,
Francesca Cima

Screenplay

Alessandro Fabbri
,
Ludovica Rampoldi
,
Stefano Sardo

Photography

Tat Radcliffe

Editor

Guido Notari

Production designer

Totoi Santoro

Costume designer

Roberto Chiocchi

Music

Pasquale Catalano

With

Ksenia Rappoport (Sonia)
,
Filippo Timi (Guido)
,
Antonia Truppo (Margherita)
,
Gaetano Bruno (Riccardo)
,
Fausto Russo Alesi (Bruno)
,
Michele Di Mauro (Dante)
,
Lorenzo Gioielli (assistant hotel manager)
,
Lidia Vitale (red woman at speed date)
,
Giampiero Iudica & Roberto Accornero (men at speed date)
,
Lucia Poli (Marisa)
,
Giorgio Colangeli (old priest)

Festivals

Venice, Toronto, Rome, London 2009

Elsewhere

As the title signals, even the clock may be duplicitous in this most cunningly constructed of psychological thrillers. Sonia, a pretty, recent arrival from Slovenia, is working as a chambermaid in a fancy Turin hotel, when she joins a speed-dating club and hits it off with Guido, a hunky security guard. A rapid, full-on introduction to Guido’s world slides into labyrinthine nightmare. Suddenly she is suffering memory blanks and the police seem to be investigating her. What’s she got herself into? When you think you’re figuring that out, new evidence appears to throw your picture out. Then, just when you think the film has gone one twist too far, you realise it hasn’t at all: what’s been going down around Sonia actually makes complete sense, and you’ve been entertained by experts. — BG.

“A real word-of-mouth, talking-point movie, which will appeal especially to connoisseurs of clever mystery scripts.” — Lee Marshall, Screendaily