The Concert (image 1)

A drama that doubles as a comedy of errors, in which music symbolises the epitome of harmony and happiness.

Louise Keller, Urban Cinefile

Screened as part of NZIFF 2010

The Concert 2009

Le Concert

Directed by Radu Mihaileanu

A band of out-of-work Moscow musicians travels to Paris posing as the celebrated Bolshoi Orchestra in this lavish, shamelessly entertaining comedy-drama from the director of Live and Become. With Mélanie Laurent.

Belgium / France / Italy / Romania In French and Russian with English subtitles
119 minutes CinemaScope / Colour and B&W

Director

Producer

Alain Attal

Screenplay

Radu Mihaileanu
,
Alain-Michel Blanc
,
Matthew Robbins. From an original story by Hector Cabello Reyes and Thierry Degrandi

Photography

Laurent Dailland

Editor

Ludovic Troch

Production designer

Cristian Niculescu

Costume designer

Viorica Petrovici

Music

Armand Amar

With

Alexeï Guskov (Andreï Filipov)
,
Dmitry Nazarov (Sacha Grossman)
,
Mélanie Laurent (Anne-Marie Jacquet)
,
François Berleand (Olivier Morne Duplessis)
,
Miou Miou (Guylène de La Rivière)
,
Valeri Barinov (Ivan Gavrilov)
,
Anna Kamenkova Pavlova (Irina Filipovna)
,
Lionel Abelanski (Jean-Paul Carrère)
,
Alexander Komissarov (Victor Vikitch)
,
Ramzy (owner of the ‘Trou Normand’)

Festivals

Rome 2009

Elsewhere

A band of out-of-work Moscow musicians travels to Paris posing as the celebrated Bolshoi Orchestra in this lavish, shamelessly popular comedy-drama from director Radu Mihaileanu (Live and Become). Andreï (Alexeï Guskov) conducted the Bolshoi until he fell out of political favour – and became the Bolshoi janitor. One night while cleaning he intercepts a fax from the Théâtre du Châtelet inviting the Bolshoi to fill a last-minute cancellation. Opportunity knocks: Andreï sets out to recruit an orchestra. ‘Be demanding and temperamental’, advises his newly designated manager: they require that a stellar young French violinist (Mélanie Laurent) be secured to perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D major with them. The French buy it! Broad national character jokes abound, showing scant regard for the PC and jostling with clowning of a more poignant nature. Old dreams are rekindled, secrets uncovered and Tchaikovsky steals the show. — BG