Lebanon (image 1)

Powerful and original. An astonishing piece of cinema.

Roderick Conway Morris, NY Times

Screened as part of NZIFF 2010

Lebanon 2009

Levanone

Directed by Samuel Maoz

Widely dubbed the Das Boot of tank warfare, this visceral, indicting Israeli film was awarded the Golden Lion at last year’s Venice Film Festival. “Powerful and original… An astonishing piece of cinema.” — NY Times

France / Germany / Israel In Arabic, English and Hebrew with English subtitles
94 minutes

Director, Screenplay

Producers

Moshe Edery
,
Leon Edery
,
Einat Bikel
,
Uri Sabag
,
David Silber
,
Benjamina Mirnik
,
Ilann Girard

Photography

Giora Bejach

Editor

Arik Lahav-Leibovich

Production designer

Ariel Roshko

Costume designer

Hila Bargiel

Music

Nicolas Becker
,
Benoît Delbecq

With

Yoav Donat (Shmulik)
,
Itay Tiran (Assi)
,
Oshri Cohen (Hertzel)
,
Michael Moshonov (Yigal)
,
Zohar Strauss (Jamil)
,
Dudu Tassa (prisoner)
,
Ashraf Barhorn (phalangist)
,
Reymonde Amsellem (Lebanese mother)

Festivals

Venice, Toronto, New York 2009; Rotterdam, San Francisco 2010

Awards

Best Film, Venice Film Festival 2009

Elsewhere

Like Ari Folman (Waltz with Bashir) Samuel Maoz served in the Israeli armed forces in the 80s, and has now made a visceral, confrontational film about his experience. His film is as much concerned with the spiritual devastation of young Israeli soldiers as it is with the violence wrought upon the invaded. A technical tour de force set over 24 hours entirely within the confines of a tank, this is a grimy, anti-heroic picture of four typical young men scared shitless. Their view of the world is perilously restricted, glimpsed through the telescopic viewfinder and crosshairs of the gunner’s sights, which move laboriously with the tank’s heavy hydraulic turret. Widely dubbed the Das Boot of tank warfare, this powerful, indicting film was awarded the Golden Lion at last year’s Venice Film Festival. — BG.

“This audacious, intensely confrontational piece is a major addition to the darker ranks of war films.” — Jonathan Romney, Sight & Sound