'Til Kingdom Come 2020

Ad Sof HaOlam

Directed by Maya Zinshtein Mobilise

An incisive investigation into the strange, contradictory drivers behind the political and philanthropic relationship of the religious American right and pro-occupation Israel.

Oct 29

Lumière Cinemas (Bardot)

Nov 01

Lumière Cinemas (Bardot)

Nov 06

Lumière Cinemas (Bardot)

Israel In English and Hebrew with English subtitles
77 minutes DCP
E
documentary film exempt from NZ Classification labelling requirements

Director

With

Yael Eckstien
,
Boyd Bingham
,
William Bingham
,
Pat Robertson

Producers

John Battsek
,
Abraham Troen
,
Maya Zinshtein

Screenplay

Mark Monroe

Cinematography

Abraham Troen

Editor

Elan Golod

Music

Miriam Cutler

Festivals

IDFA, DOC NYC 2020

Elsewhere

Have you ever met someone with a near obsessive passion for another’s culture? ‘Til Kingdom Come dives deep into this discomforting experience as Israeli journalist-documentarian Maya Zinshtein attempts to fathom the whys-and-wherefores of the unusual bonds between fundamentalist American Evangelical Christians and Israeli Jews.

The film spends time with father-son team William and Boyd Bingham, pastors of an impoverished, pro-Israel church community in small-town Kentucky (representative of a powerful United States voting bloc); the Eckstein family-run International Fellowship of Christians & Jews; hardline Israeli settler organisations; and the politicians and lobbyists pushing their agendas.

The filmmakers provide a respectful space for each interviewee to share freely whilst maintaining firm editorial control over the shape of the film’s engaging narrative. The sifting and contrasting of various viewpoints reveals a strange symbiosis between groups who each derive significant benefits (political, financial, religious) from the other, whilst ignoring their ultimately oppositional aims. Without ever overwhelming, Zinshtein’s position slowly but surely solidifies, shrewdly encapsulated in the film’s final moments. — Jacob Powell

“What emerges from the film is not only a disturbing picture of how extremist political and religious agendas are connected, but also a sense of the contradictions involved, including... the dubious question for Jews of getting into bed with the far right.” — Jonathan Romney, Screendaily