Blaze (image 1)

A film that rambles, scrambles, fights its way to the finish line, exactly the way its subject would have wanted it to be.

Jordan Ruimy, The Playlist

Blaze 2018

Directed by Ethan Hawke Music & Dance

Ethan Hawke turns director with this SXSW hit, a dramatic tribute to an Outlaw Country legend; both a love story and a requiem for a ramblin man, highlighted by singer Benjamin Dickey’s incredible turn as Blaze Foley.

Aug 10

The Roxy Cinema

Aug 11

Reading Cinema 10

Aug 12

Reading Cinema 9

USA In English
127 minutes DCP
M
drug use & offensive language

Director

Producers

Jake Seal
,
Ethan Hawke
,
John Sloss
,
Ryan Hawke

Screenplay

Ethan Hawke
,
Sybil Rosen

Photography

Steve Cosens

Editor

Jason Gourson

Production designer

Thomas Hayek

Costume designer

Lee Kyle

Music

Blaze Foley
,
Townes Van Zandt

With

Ben Dickey (Blaze Foley)
,
Alia Shawkat (Sybil Rosen)
,
Josh Hamilton (Zee)
,
Charlie Sexton (Townes Van Zandt)

Festivals

Sundance, SXSW 2018

It’s official: Ethan Hawke owns NZIFF18. Here he steps behind the camera to direct a fittingly unconventional biopic of singer-songwriter Blaze Foley, who went from living in a Georgia treehouse to befriending songwriter Townes Van Zandt and becoming the insider legend of the Outlaw Country Music movement.

“A belated but heartfelt eulogy for a songwriter who didn’t live long enough to drink himself to death like his most famous friend, Ethan Hawke’s Blaze will be the first introduction most viewers have to Blaze Foley… Hawke goes in search of his tender side and finds it in a big way, thanks in large part to a charismatic lead performance by musician Ben Dickey, a first-timer who doesn’t look it.

Merle Haggard, John Prine, Lyle Lovett and others have recorded Foley’s songs, and Lucinda Williams wrote a great one about him. But when he died of a gunshot wound in 1989, you wouldn’t have been able to find any of his music in stores… Foley’s cult may never grow as big as his most ardent fans would like. But Hawke and Sybil Rosen [Foley’s longtime partner and biographer] and Dickey have given the man something better than posthumous record sales.” — John DeFore, Hollywood Reporter