Pinocchio (image 1)

The consensus among animation fans is that 1940's Pinocchio remains the most perfect animated feature Walt Disney produced

Charles Solomon, LA Times

Screened as part of Autumn Events 2015

Pinocchio 1940

Directed by Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske

It takes a giant screen to reveal the wealth of detail literally drawn into every frame of this 75-year-old Disney wonder. With battalions of animators at his disposal, Disney transformed Carlo Collodi’s fairy tale about an obnoxious living puppet into an action-packed moral fable about a gullible one – and a virtuoso example of pure cinematic storytelling.

Apr 18

The Civic Theatre

Apr 19

The Civic Theatre

USA In English
88 minutes DCP
cert

Producer

Walt Disney

Screenplay

Ted Sears
,
Otto Englander
,
Webb Smith
,
William Cottrell
,
Joseph Sabo
,
Erdman Penner

Sequence directors

Bill Roberts
,
Norman Ferguson
,
Jack Kinney
,
Wilfred Jackson
,
T. Hee

Animation directors

Fred Moore
,
Franklin Thomas
,
Milton Kahl
,
Vladimir Tytla
,
Ward Kimball
,
Arthur Babbitt
,
Eric Larson
,
Woolie Reitherman

Character designers

Joe Grant
,
Albert Hurter
,
John P. Miller
,
Campbell Grant
,
Martin Provensen
,
John Walbridge

Music

Leigh Harline
,
Ned Washington
,
Paul J. Smith

Voices

Dickie Jones (Pinocchio)
,
Christian Rub (Geppetto)
,
Cliff Edwards (Jiminy Cricket)
,
Evelyn Venable (the Blue Fairy)
,
Walter Catlett (J. Worthington Foulfellow)
,
Frankie Darro (Lampwick)

Elsewhere

“The movie, made in 1940 comes from the era of full animation… Real human artists lovingly illustrated every frame of this movie, and weren't afraid to take pains with the details, like the waves on the ocean that curl back in horror at the approach of Monstro the Whale.

The movie looks great, it contains terrific songs (including the immortal ‘When You Wish Upon a Star’), and the story is scary in a way kids can identify with. Pinocchio is without a doubt the most passive and simple-minded of the Disney cartoon heroes, but he's surrounded by a colorful gallery of villains and connivers, including the evil Stromboli, who thinks there is money to be made from a wooden puppet who can walk and talk. And on the good side, of course, there are Jiminy Cricket, whose high-wire act on a violin string is one of the greatest moments in the history of animation, and the kindly old Geppetto, who wants a son and is overjoyed when his puppet comes to life…

The beauty of Pinocchio is that what happens to Pinocchio seems plausible to the average kid… Kids may not understand falling in love with a prince, but they understand not listening to your father, and being a bad boy, and running away and getting into real trouble. The movie is genuinely exciting and romantic, great to look at, and timeless.” — Roger Ebert

“Every element in Pinocchio shimmers with the energy of young artists revelling in their newly discovered powers of creation.” — Charles Solomon, LA Times