Everyday Objects (image 1)

A crisp little character study; a cerebral snapshot of the moneyed, cultured, multilingual bourgeoisie at play.

Stephen Dalton, Hollywood Reporter

Screened as part of NZIFF 2013

Everyday Objects 2013

Halbschatten

Directed by Nicolas Wackerbarth

A young woman on holiday in Nice tries to befriend her absent lover’s haughty teenage kids in this crisply observed drama. “A cerebral snapshot of the moneyed, cultured, multilingual bourgeoisie at play.” — Hollywood Reporter

France / Germany In German with English subtitles
80 minutes DCP

Director, Screenplay

Producers

Titus Kreyenberg
,
Antoine Simkine

Photography

Reinhold Vorschneider

Editor

Janina Herhoffer

Production designer

Beatrice Schultz

Costume designer

Manfred Schneider

Sound

Emil Klotzsch
,
William Edouard Franck

Music

Olivier Mellano

With

Anne Ratte-Polle (Merle)
,
Leonard Proxauf (Felix)
,
Emma Bading (Emma)
,
Maren Kroymann (Johanna)
,
Nathalie Richard (Olga)
,
Lou Castel (Daniel)
,
Soroosh Lavasani (Darian)
,
David Fennelly (Mat)
,
Jean-Christophe Folly (Kalu)
,
Maria Laborit (salesgirl)
,
Henry Arnold (Romuald)

Festivals

Berlin, San Francisco 2013

Elsewhere

Expecting to meet her lover Romuald, Merle turns up at his hillside villa in Nice to find that he’s had a change of plans. Romuald’s 13-year-old daughter Emma and his 16-year-old son Felix don’t exactly make her welcome, but she bides her time working on the book she is writing, then attempts to ingratiate herself with Emma, Felix and their circle, who are taking full advantage of their father’s neglect. In a concise, coolly formal style, director Nicolas Wackerbarth observes the subtle drama of self-discovery in Merle’s efforts to carve out a space where she may never belong. “An intelligent and seductive work… Stories about people having bad times in nice places, especially on holiday, has become a prominent sub-genre of European art cinema – notably, in Joanna Hogg’s Unrelated and Maren Ade’s Everyone Else. German feature Everyday Objects is an impressive, keenly focused addition to this cycle.” — Jonathan Romney, Screendaily