Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters (image 1)

It's a terrible, lovely, uncanny sort of place, a real-world Twilight Zone of Americana made all the more real by nature of its fakery.

Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle

Screened as part of Autumn Events 2013

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters 2012

Directed by Ben Shapiro

“An acclaimed photographer with the eye of a filmmaker, Gregory Crewdson has created some of the most gorgeously haunting pictures in the history of the medium.” — Zeitgeist Films

USA
77 minutes

Buy or Rent

Director

Producer/Photography

Ben Shapiro

Editors

Tom Patterson, Nancy Kennedy

Music

Dana Kaproff

With

Gregory Crewdson, Russell Banks, Rick Moody, Laurie Simmons, Melissa Harris, Richard Sands

Festivals

SXSW 2012

“An acclaimed photographer with the eye of a filmmaker, Gregory Crewdson has created some of the most gorgeously haunting pictures in the history of the medium. His meticulously composed, large-scale images are stunning narratives of small-town American life – moviescapes crystallized into a single frame. While the photographs are staged with crews that rival many feature film productions, Crewdson takes inspiration as much from his own dreams and fantasies as the worlds of Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, Edward Hopper and Diane Arbus. Crewdson’s imagery has also infiltrated the pop culture landscape – including his inimitable Six Feet Under ads and Yo La Tengo album art. Shot over a decade with unprecedented access, Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters beautifully bares the artist’s process – and it’s as mesmerizing as the images themselves.” — Zeitgeist Films

“Like Wes Anderson’s small-town gothic negative, Brooklyn native, Yale-educated Crewdson has an obsessive eye for physical detail, here creating image after image of postcapitalist desolation that marry cinematic sweep with diorama’s intimate, dollhouse precision… Crewdson and others (including Russell Banks and Laurie Simmons) speak eloquently about his project, but it’s the on-set agonies – to achieve the fleeting expression here, dark kiss of light there, and the peculiar relief they bring our maestro – that fascinate.” — Michelle Orange, Village Voice