A Somewhat Gentle Man (image 1)

Stellan Skarsgård finds the humor in a criminal who just wants to get along.

Ray Bennett, Hollywood Reporter

Screened as part of NZIFF 2010

A Somewhat Gentle Man 2009

En ganske snill mann

Directed by Hans Petter Moland

Dry Nordic humour is at its most diabolically deadpan in this cool comedy thriller which pitches an ex-con (Stellan Skarsgård) aiming to lead a quiet, simple life into a deadbeat world determined to thwart his every effort.

Norway In Norwegian, Polish, Sami and Swedish with English subtitles
111 minutes

Producers

Finn Gjerdrum
,
Stein B. Kvae

Screenplay

Kim Fupz Aakeson

Photography

Phillip Øgaard

Editor

Jens Christian Fodstad

Production designer

Gert Wibe

Costume designer

Caroline Sætre

Music

Halfdan E

With

Stellan Skarsgård (Ulrik)
,
Bjørn Floberg (Rune Jensen)
,
Gard B. Eidsvold (Rolf)
,
Jorunn Kjellsby (Karen Margrethe)
,
Jan Gunnar Røise (Geir)
,
Jannike Kruse (Merete)
,
Bjørn Sundquist (Sven)
,
Jon Øigarden (Kristian)
,
Kjersti Holmen (Wenche)
,
Julia Bache Wiig (Silje)
,
Aksel Hennie (Samen)
,
Henrik Mestad (Kenny)
,
Ane H. Røvik Wahlen (Kenny’s wife)

Festivals

Berlin 2010

Elsewhere

Dry Nordic humour is at its most diabolically deadpan in this cool comedy thriller which pitches an ex-con aiming to lead a quiet, simple life into a deadbeat world determined to thwart his every effort. — SR

“With its off-the-wall-and-well-out-the-door humor, flashes of violence and broad-brushed, quirky personalities, the picture feels almost like an homage to older Coen brothers movies… At the same time, the characters’ distinctive genial gruffness and adherence to bourgeois propriety even in the shabbiest circumstances, and the underplayed comedy throughout, mark the sensibility as distinctly Scandinavian.” — Leslie Felperin, Variety

“Norwegian director Hans Petter Moland and Swedish actor Stellan Skarsgård are a match made in cinema heaven… They achieve a cool, deceptively simple minimalism which is both perfectly timed and brilliantly pared-down… Chaplin would have embraced it.” — Howard Feinstein, Screendaily