Perlimps 2022

Directed by Alê Abreu Square Eyes

Two secret agents from enemy Kingdoms are sent to a world on the brink of a terrible war where they have one important mission: to find the Perlimps, mysterious creatures who can ultimately bring peace.

Aug 06

The Civic Theatre

Brazil In Portuguese with English subtitles
76 minutes DCP
PG
cert

Director, Screenplay, Editor

Producers

Laís Bodanzky
,
Luiz Bolognesi
,
Ernesto Soto
,
Alê Abreu

Animation

Alê Abreu
,
Sandro Cleuzo

Music

André Hosoi O Grivo

Voices

Lorenzo Tarantelli (Claé)
,
Giulia Benite (Bruô)
,
Stênio Garcia (John Ovenbird)
,
Rosa Rosah (mother)
,
Nill Marcondes (father)

Festivals

Annecy 2022

Elsewhere

Acclaimed Brazilian writer-director Alê Abreu, director of Oscar-nominated The Boy and the World (NZIFF 2013), has created a dazzling animated love letter for all-ages, encouraging an awareness of social and ecological issues, and a taste for art, while delivering a film of enormous artistic ambition and visual complexity.

Alê’s unique animated world presents a mythical prism of kaleidoscopic colour – a dense enchanted impressionist forest, created through painterly tropical tones. It’s breathtaking. Feisty and smart, Claé and Bruó, enemy agents from the Kingdoms of the Sun and the Moon, live in a world of these intricate backgrounds, all painted by hand. Initially combative and competitive, these plucky explorers reluctantly band together in a bid to save their precious woodland, and the Perlimps, from the Giants surrounding the forest.

Nine years in the making, Perlimps has landed here and now to offer a timely allegorical perspective on the state of our world, particularly the climate crisis and armed conflicts – providing an ideal way for kids to unpack these big issues. What at first appears to be a straightforward narrative adventure story, perfect for even the smallest of audience members, suddenly offers up layers of meaning and a profound philosophical statement about guardianship, the unsurmountable walls between warring ideologies, and growing up and finding your voice. — Nic Marshall

Recommended for ages 7+