Faces Places 2017

Visages villages

Directed by Agnès Varda, JR Big Nights

In this utterly charming documentary, octogenarian French director Agnès Varda takes to the road with the young photo-muralist JR, creating artworks, looking up old friends and finding new ones.

France In French with English subtitles
89 minutes DCP
E

Directors/Screenplay

Photography

Claire Duguet
,
Nicolas Guicheteau
,
Valentin Vignet
,
Romain Le Bonniec
,
Raphael Minnesota
,
Roberto De Angelis
,
Julia Fabry

Editors

Agnès Varda
,
Maxime Pozzi Garcia

Music

M (Matthieu Chedid)

With

Agnès Varda, JR

Festivals

Cannes (Out of Competition) 2017

Elsewhere

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

The Pantograph Punch

88-year-old Agnès Varda, working in collaboration with the young photo-muralist JR, reminds us that big themes can live in small places – and that every life yields something to celebrate. As the two travel across France, looking up old friends and creating artworks from photographs of the people they meet, a friendship blossoms, and with it a wonderful free flow of ideas and observations.

“She is nearly 90; he is 34. She worked with Jean-Luc Godard; he looks like Jean-Luc Godard (and, much to Varda’s consternation, will similarly not take off his sunglasses). And yet, the movie is barely five minutes old before it’s clear that these two are a screen duo for the ages... Varda has always possessed a warm and compulsively watchable screen presence, and the pint-sized iconoclast still has more pep in her step than most of us have ever had… JR is an absolute joy (and a mensch, to boot)… Teasing at times, quietly deferential at others, he taps into his co-star’s inherent sense of wonder and creates a canvas big enough for her to fit all of the ideas that she’s still dying to project.” — David Ehrlich, Indiewire

“In her magnificent, groundbreaking, nearly 60-year career, this is one of her most profoundly personal and exuberantly populist works. A tour de France that is both a romp and a meditation on photography, cinema, and mortality, with brief appearances by Mimi, the scene-stealing cat, it is at once poetry and the naked truth, shape-shifting before one’s eyes, and promising ever more pleasure with each viewing.” — Amy Taubin, Film Comment