Tātarakihi: The Children of Parihaka (image 1)

This film is dedicated to the memory of all who have carried the kaupapa of passive resistance taught by Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi.

Screened as part of NZIFF 2012

Tātarakihi: The Children of Parihaka 2012

Directed by Paora Te Oti Takarangi Joseph

Tātarakihi tells the story of a ‘journey of memory’ taken by a group of Parihaka children following in the footsteps of their male ancestors who were transported south after the Taranaki land confiscations of the 1860s.

New Zealand In English and Te reo Māori with English subtitles
65 minutes Blu-ray

Co-director

Janine Martin

Producers, Screenplay

Janine Martin
,
Paora Te Oti Takarangi Joseph

Executive producer

Gaylene Preston

Photography

Paora Te Oti Takarangi Joseph
,
Duane Phillips

Editors

Simon Price
,
Tracey Egerton

World Premiere

Soundings Theatre, Te Papa, 28 July 2012

In 1881 the children of Parihaka greeted the government invaders with white feathers of peace. Tātarakihi tells the story of a ‘journey of memory’ taken by a group of Parihaka children who travel to the South Island 130 years later. They follow in the footsteps of their male ancestors who were transported south after the Taranaki land confiscations of the 1860s. Wellington War Memorial, Addington Jail and Ripapa Island in Lyttelton Harbour are key stations on the long bus journey to the caves at Andersons Bay in Dunedin where the Parihaka men were imprisoned. The prisoners were forced to labour on buildings, roads and embankments. These enduring expressions of Dunedin’s 19th-century prosperity were founded on something closely resembling slavery. Ensuring that the experience of the slaves endures as well, the passage of knowledge conveyed in and by Tātarakihi is both sombre and enriching. The film is narrated by the children and combines footage of their hikoi (some of it shot by the children themselves) with vivid archival photography. — BG