An Inconvenient Truth (image 1)

A brilliantly lucid, often riveting attempt to warn Americans off our hellbent path to global suicide.

David Remnick, New Yorker

Screened as part of NZIFF 2006

An Inconvenient Truth 2006

Directed by Davis Guggenheim

In a landmark year for hard-hitting activist cinema, Al Gore’s straightforward and devastating film on global warming stands out as exceptionally well-honed and persuasive.

USA In English
95 minutes 35mm

Director

Photography

Bob Richman
,
Davis Guggenheim

Editors

Jay Cassidy
,
Dan Swietlik

Music

Michael Brook

With

Al Gore

Festivals

Sundance, Cannes (Out of Competition) 2006

Elsewhere

In a landmark year for hard-hitting activist cinema, this brilliantly straightforward – and devastating – film on global warming stands out as exceptionally well-honed and persuasive. It also signals the return of Al Gore, who has been far from idle in the years since the 2000 US presidential election was awarded to George W. Bush. Gore has devoted his time to delivering a multimedia slide show on the imminence of catastrophic global warming wherever he can find an audience. And this film is simply the best means possible to get that show to a wider audience. One thing’s certain: Gore will do more good for his country and the world with this movie than Bush ever did by beating him.

“You will see the Arctic and Antarctic ice caps melting. You will see Greenland oozing into the sea. You will see the atmosphere polluted with greenhouse gases that block heat from escaping. You will see photos from space of what the ice caps looked like once and what they look like now and, in animation, you will see how high the oceans might rise… I promise, you will be captivated, and then riveted and then scared out of your wits. Our Earth is going to hell in a handbasket.” — Richard Cohen, Washington Post

“What Gore strives to make crystal clear to anyone in opposition is that the tools and methods to reverse these calamitous changes are at hand – no new inventions required – and that the economic consequences of tackling the problem are positive rather than negative. The idea that responsible environmental protection is bad for the economy is exposed here through facts and science for what it is – a Big Lie.” — Kirk Honeycutt, Hollywood Reporter