The Future of Food (image 1)

Screened as part of NZIFF 2005

The Future of Food 2004

Directed by Deborah Koons Garcia

The Future of Food gets to the elemental truths about genetically modified seeds and produce.” — Laura Singara, Village Voice

USA In Spanish with English subtitles
89 minutes 35mm

Director, Screenplay

Photography

John Chater

Editor

Vivien Hillgrove

Music

Todd Boekelheide

Narrator

Sara Maamouri

Elsewhere

The Future of Food is a vivid everyperson’s guide to agribusiness: the aggressive corporate push for genetically modified food and ownership of genetic crop resources. Like The Corporation, this is lucid, expertly researched, activist filmmaking – a daunting picture of corporate power and individual disempowerment designed to promote the opposite. "The new documentary, created by Deborah Koons Garcia, uses archival footage and interviews with farmers and agriculture experts to argue that GMO foods are jeopardizing our food safety. During the past 10 years, the film tells us, genetically engineered crops have infected our food supply and undermined cultivation methods that have been refined over thousands of years... Exploring a gamut of issues from so-called suicide seeds to lax food-safety enforcement laws, and from the controversy over patented genes to infected cornfields, the film is a comprehensive and chilling example of anti-GMO rhetoric.” — Jason Silverman, Wired

“In less skillful hands, a film about genetically modified food could have been tough sledding for regular folks to sit through. Making visual sense of the science alone would be a daunting task. But The Future of Food is an engaging and lucid presentation of not only the science of genetic engineering, but of the people and the politics behind what looks to be a pitched battle to control the global food supply… And the many startling facts that it presents about both the agriculture industry and the US government that continues to prop it up with taxpayer subsidies make the film very difficult for a reasonable person to dismiss as mere anti-GM propaganda.” — Denise Caruso, AlterNet