Why Don’t You Play in Hell? 2013

Jigoku de naze warui

Directed by Sono Sion Incredibly Strange

The latest from Japanese cult favourite Sono Sion (Suicide Club, Love Exposure ) delivers a rousing and hilarious midnight movie pitching two bloodthirsty Yakuza clans against a band of chaotic wannabe filmmakers.

Japan In Japanese with English subtitles
129 minutes DCP
R18 (drug use, graphic violence, offensive language)

Director

Screenplay

Sono Sion

Producers

Suzuki Takeshi
,
Matsuno Takuyuki

Photography

Yamamoto Hideo

Editor

Ito Junichi

Music

Inai Keiji
,
Sono Sion

With

Kunimura Jun (Muti Taizo)
,
Tsutsumi Shinichi (Ikegami Jun)
,
Hasegawa Hiroki (Hirata Don)
,
Hoshino Gen (Hashimoto Koji)
,
Nikaido Fumi (Muto Mitsuko, Taizo’s daughter)
,
Tomochika (Muto Shizue, Taizo’s wife)

Elsewhere

“Sono Sion’s rousing, freewheeling, scattershot and ultimately astonishingly bloodthirsty film is a classic cult title that will keep midnight movie fans entertained and amused, especially as it really hits its stride in the final 45 minutes and revels in a sword-fight sequence that out-gores Quentin Tarantino’s sequence in Kill Bill… The wonderfully garishly titled Why Don’t You Play in Hell? is a playful blending of Yakuza conflict while also acting as tribute to filmmaking, and while the line-delivery is based around the shouting technique for most of the time (this is not a quiet film), there is also a whole lot of B-movie fun to be had.

It takes a while for the film’s several story strands – a gang of young wannabe filmmakers who relish filming violence; a stand-off between two rival Yakuza gangs; the antics of a child advert star moppet turned would be adult actress and the callow youth who has adored her for years and will do anything for her – but once they collide properly the film finds its real momentum… Often hysterical in structure, the film is punctuated with delightfully framed sequences and a sense that writer/director Sono Sion is simply having a bit of fun…and if audiences buy into his subversive craziness there is a good deal of bloody fun to be had on the journey.” — Mark Adams, Screendaily