Screened as part of NZIFF 2016

Perfect Strangers 2016

Perfetti sconsciuti

Directed by Paolo Genovese

A gathering of old friends accepts the challenge to share all incoming calls and messages. It’s a game you won’t want to emulate at your next dinner party, but dammit, you’ll be thinking about it.

Italy In Italian with English subtitles
96 minutes DCP
M (offensive language and sexual themes)

Director

Producer

Marco Belardi

Screenplay

Filippo Bologna
,
Paolo Costella
,
Paolo Genovese
,
Paola Mammini
,
Rolando Ravello

Photography

Fabrizio Lucci

Editor

Consuelo Catucci

Production designer

Chiara Balducci

Costume designers

Grazia Materia
,
Camilla Giuliani

Music

Maurizio Filardo

With

Giuseppe Battiston (Peppe)
,
Anna Foglietta (Carlotta)
,
Marco Giallini (Rocco)
,
Edoardo Leo (Cosimo)
,
Valerio Mastandrea (Lele)
,
Alba Rohrwacher (Bianca)
,
Kasia Smutniak (Eva)

Festivals

Tribeca 2016

Awards

Best Film
,
David di Donatello Awards 2016

Elsewhere

Named Best Film at the Donatellos, ‘the Italian Oscars’, Perfect Strangers offers a fiendish take on mobile-device decorum. Fairly bristling with talking points, it became a national sensation and box office hit.

Three 30-something couples and their bachelor friend who have all known each other for years meet for a dinner party. They agree that no private calling or messaging will disrupt their evening. Instead, in a communal fit of ‘We have nothing to hide’ bravado, they’ll place their devices on the table. Every incoming text, email or call will be shared with the whole party. (Letting a caller know they’re on speaker is considered a cheat.) You may soon be asking why they didn’t just play Russian roulette, as the secret projects, extra-mural liaisons and uncool online hook-ups hit the table. Complicating matters most adroitly – and lending a measure of credibility to their recklessness – is some furtive phone-swapping intended to protect the guilty. A stellar cast, including Alba Rohrwacher, Marco Giallini, and other Italian favourites skilfully manoeuvre the transitions from tender comedy through painful comeuppance to the restoration of sanity.