Screened as part of Autumn Events 2016

Fargo 1996

Directed by Joel Coen

Murderous goons meet their match in a downhome Minnesota cop, the inimitable Frances McDormand as Detective Marge Gunderson, chirpy, relentless and seven months pregnant. Landmark ‘true crime’ comedy from the Coens.

USA In English
103 minutes DCP
R18 (violence)

Director

Producer

Ethan Coen

Screenplay

Ethan Coen
,
Joel Coen

Photography

Roger Deakins

Editor

Roderick Jaynes

Production designer

Rick Heinrichs

Costume designer

Mary Zophres

Music

Carter Burwell

With

Frances McDormand (Marge Gunderson)
,
Steve Buscemi (Carl Showalter)
,
William H. Macy (Jerry Lundegaard)
,
Peter Stormare (Gaear Grimsrud)
,
Harve Presnell (Wade Gustafson)
,
John Carroll Lynch (Norm Gunderson)
,
Kristin Rudrüd (Jean Lundegaard)

Elsewhere

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Flicks

You can’t beat the original recipe: Joel and Ethan Coen’s 1996 ‘true crime’ put-on still tastes mighty flavoursome in this 20th anniversary 4K digital restoration.

 

“The Coens’ masterpiece… Rarely have the Coens’ sensibilities coalesced more exquisitely than in this alternately comic and brutal caper set in the brothers’ native Minnesota and capped with Frances McDormand’s Oscar-winning performance as the sensible, pregnant police chief Marge Gunderson. Once more into the Midwestern winter? Oh, ya, you betcha.” — Andy Webster, NY Times

 

“Joel and Ethan Coen return to their roots… serving up a deep dark American feast of red blood, white fields and police blues. Jerry Lundegaard (William H. Macy) is an indebted Porky Pig of a car salesman with a hapless plan: hire two hoods (greasy Steve Buscemi, spookily silent Peter Stormare) to kidnap his wife. Bad move. As the ice follies snowball into chaos, the body count mounts. Thank goodness for the unflappable competence of local police chief Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand), investigation unhampered by her seven-month pregnancy. Riveting every crime with their trademark humour, the Coens get career-best performances all round.” — Mark Cubey, Auckland International Film Festival 1996